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India vs England 3rd ODI 1985 Article

Read the article of India vs England 3rd ODI 1985 - England tour of India 5-match one-day international series of the 3rd ODI match played between England and India at Karnataka State Cricket Association Stadium, Bangalore in 20th January 1985.



Vic Marks' three-wicket haul before An unbeaten half-century steers to England comfortable three-wicket victory over India, despite a crowd riot and took an unassailable 3-0 lead to seal the series in the third ODI.


India scored 205-6 in 46 overs with top scorer by Debutant Mohammad Azharuddin - who hammered a unbeaten 47 off 37-balls on his debut ODI match - including 6-fours with strike rate of 127.02.

Sunil Gavaskar hit 40 off 58-balls including 3-fours, Ravi Shastri scored 33 off 43-balls included a boundary.

Kris Srikkanth scored 29 off 56-balls including 2-fours & a six and Dilip Vengsarkar hit 23 off 42-balls included 2-fours.

England best bowler by Vic Marks picked up 3-wickets for 35-runs in 10-overs including a maiden, Norman Cowans and Phil Edmonds both took one-wickets.

England chased 206-7 in 45 overs with top scorer by Allan Lamb cracked a unbeaten 59 off 75-balls including 4-fours & a six.

Graeme Fowler struck 45 off 58-balls including 4-fours, David Gower hit 38 off 55-balls included four-fours and Vic Marks 17.

India best bowler by Kapil Dev picked up 3-wickets for 38-runs in 10-overs, Ravi Shastri and Ashok Patel both took one-wickets.



This match reported by Michael Carey (Third Party Reference from The Daily Telegraph)

ENGLAND defeated India by three wickets in their one day international in Bangalore today to take a winning 3-0 lead in the series, though this was achieved only after a 20-minute stoppage while Gavaskar led his side off the field following one of several bouts of missile-hurling by the crowd.

Without consulting the umpires, Gasvaskar stormed to the dressing-room, brushing brusquely past local officials trying to persuade him to return.

The rest of his team followed at a more leisurely pace and some hung around on the boundary in front of the pavilion.

There followed several loud-speaker appeals to sections of the 47,000 crowd to behave and while ground ground staff removed bottles and other objects from the outfield, the England manager, Tony Brown, went on to the field to speak with the umpires and other officials.

He returned to the pavilion after having a word with the batsmen. Paul Downton and Allan Lamb, who were out of range of the bottle-throwers, to say: "There was no danger to our players, I think Lamb was enjoying it out there.

"The umpires said that they would not abandon the game. But I made it very clear that if India did not reappear we would Consider they had conceded the match ".


Marginally ahead

At that point England, needing 206 for victory off 46 overs, had made 173 for five from 59-4 overs and were marginally ahead of their asking rate by 4.48 runs an over compared with India's 4-45.

At length, a guarantee of safety from local officials persuaded Gavaskar to take his side out again and Lamb's unbeaten 59, which earned him the Man of the Match award, steered Engand home with an over to spare in the face of much undistinguished cricket by their opponents.

It was a pretty sordid ending to match that, in any case, should have been more clinically and comfortably won by England. It was also the second interruption of its kind in this series. The first occurred at Poona where the umpires suspended play until order was restored.

Gavaskar insisted afterwards that he had told the umpires that he would take his team off if one more bottle was thrown after three separate episodes, in the third of which Ashok Patel, the off-spinner, was struck a glancing blow while fielding on the bundary.


Umpires' view

Both umpires, however, told me later that Gavaskar had never intimated this move to them, which was why they stayed in the middle. We would have awarded the game to England on appeal even if they had not already been ahead," one of them told me.

The trouble had started during England's innings and was no doubt influenced by India's often indifferent efforts in the field. At one point, broken glass had to be removed from the outfield.

Each time loudspeaker announcements called for law and order, with the threat that the game would be halted. This trouble, when added to that experienced during Australia's recent, tour of one-day matches cast a serious doubt over India's ability to part-stage the next World Cup in 1987.

Quite apart from the problems involved in staging the games in one day which seems to be the object of one-day cricket others, such as delayed flights, the non-arrival of playing kit and, from a purely personal view. indifferent Press facilities all point to a competition which. Fred Karno would have been proud of.


Flawed performance

As in their previous successes. England's win today was earned despite a flawed performance, especially with the bat. after Gower had won the toss and India had been made to work hard for their runs.

Initially, the ball moved about and bounced awkwardly, especially for Cowans, and Gavaskar and Srikkanth put on 70 together only because it was one of those mornings when they played and missed rather than found the edge.

Eventually they went in successive overs, Srikkanth playing on as he tried to force Cowans and Gavaskar top-edging an inten. ded sweep against Marks.

The promotion of Kapil Dev with the idea of savaging Marks, did not succeed and the off spinner also had Vengsarkar stumped during a tidy spell, after which Azharuddin's place in the order seemed wastefuly low as he fired off strokes of quality, which enabled India to make 86 from their last 12 overs.


Gatting run out

The overall asking rate was the smallest vet for England, but after Robinson had edged kapil's outswinger to Viswanath. the wicketkeeper they produced a series of self-induced problems. starting when Gatting was need- lessly run out after only five balls.

Surviving an lbw appeal against Kapil, he set off for a single without appearing to appreciate that Azharaddin was swooping on the ball at point and, with Fowler not moving, he failed to regain his ground.

Fowler played well and so did Gower, timing some hooks and drives so sweetly that a return to better days seemed not far ahead. With the singles being collected comfortably, England were coasting it, 70 runs coming from 15 overs.



Diving catch

But Fowler then looked for a single for a push into the covers and could not get back when Shastri, the. bowler, made a swift follow through and pick up and Gower was bowled heaving across the line soon afterwards.

Lamb took some time finding his touch and after Marks had gone to Gavaskar's brilliant diving catch at mid-wicket, he and Downton began the last 10 overs with 58 required, the most



Diving catch

But Fowler then looked for a single for a push into the covers and could not get back when Shastri, the bowler, made a swift follow through and pick up and Gower was bowled heaving across the line soon afterwards.

Lamb took some time finding his touch and after Marks had gone to Gavaskar's brilliant diving catch at mid-wicket, he and Downton began the last 10 overs with 58 required, the most demanding rate England had faced since the start.

Ghai's return after two costly overs earlier, however, enabled Lamb to hit him for 4-6-6 off successive balls and after that. despite the loss of Downton and Edmonds, and the crowd's antics, England always had more idea of where they were going than their opponents.

Two matches remain in the series-in Nagpur on Wednesday and in Chandigarh next Sunday.

                   

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